2.10-P20: Ethics and economics regarding access to healthcare for marginalised groups

Ursula Trummer, Sonja Novak-Zezula, Nadav Davidovitch, Nora Gottlieb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background:
The main arguments for improving access to health care for marginalised groups have often been primarily based on public health considerations, human rights claims and ethical principles of equity. However, the respective political debates often focus on economic arguments such as moral hazard, (presumed) related health expenses, and the need to safeguard scarce resources. Acknowledging the role of economic arguments in political discourses and decision-making processes, researchers have begun to pay more attention to the fiscal implications of limiting health coverage for migrant and ethnic minority groups.
Objectives:
The poster aims to provide insights into recent debates concerning access to health care for marginalised groups such as undocumented migrants.
Key findings or ideas:
Recent studies show that the economic argument supports inclusion of marginalised groups such as undocumented migrants into health care.
Conclusions/Recommendations:
Discussions are necessary on how to introduce evidence-based economic arguments into political debates.
Main message:
Inclusion of marginalised migrant groups allows the fulfilment of equity principles and general human rights, but also avoids future preventable costs for society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)134
JournalThe European Journal of Public Health
Volume28
Issue numbersuppl1
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Apr 2018

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