A 10-year prospective study of respiratory disease and depression and anxiety in adulthood

Renee D. Goodwin, Bari Scheckner, Lillian Pena, Jonathan M. Feldman, Farah Taha, Joshua D. Lipsitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Conclusion Findings shed new light on the association between respiratory disease and depression or anxiety disorders. Individuals with respiratory disease appear to have higher prevalence of concurrent depression or anxiety disorders and persistent depression or anxiety disorders compared with those without respiratory disease. However, a history of respiratory disease does not appear to confer increased risk of new onset of depression or anxiety disorders.

Methods Data were drawn from the Midlife Development in the United States survey, a representative sample of adults in the United States ages 18 to 74 years. Participants (N = 2,101) were interviewed on a range of health domains at baseline at wave 1 (1994) and again at wave 2 (2005).

Results Respiratory disease was associated with increased odds of depression and anxiety disorders cross-sectionally at both time points. Respiratory disease at wave 1 was not associated with incident depression or anxiety disorders at wave 2. Respiratory disease at wave 1 was associated with increased odds of persistent depression or anxiety disorders 10 years later among those with depression or anxiety disorders at wave 1. Associations were not explained by differences in demographic characteristics, secondhand smoke exposure, cigarette smoking, or history of exposure to childhood maltreatment.

Background Several cross-sectional studies have found an association between respiratory disease and increased mood or anxiety disorders among adults. Little is known about the nature of these associations over time or the role of potential confounders in these links.

Objectives To investigate the association between respiratory disease and incident and persistent depression or anxiety disorders 10 years later and to examine potential pathways of these associations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)565-570
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume113
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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