A comparison of "on-thigh" vibrotactile, combined visual-vibrotactile, and visual-only alerting systems for the cockpit under visually demanding conditions

Yael Salze, Tal Oron-Gilad

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the cockpit, performance is prone to break down. Conveying crucial information through the tactile modality, which requires little to no additional effort, has been previously examined as means to improve performance and safety. Previously, we demonstrated the ability of the onthigh vibrotactile alerting display to convey directional cues in the vertical plane. We hypothesized that tactile directional alerting cues would be beneficial in a visually loaded multitasking environment. In the current study, two tasks were introduced simultaneously: a directional task where participants respond to directional cues (visual, tactile, or combination of both), and a visual-memory recall task where participants identify, count and recall objects embedded in flight movies. Response time, accuracy and subjective workload were evaluated. Performance in the memory recall task and subjective workload were in favor of the combined tactile & visual configuration. No performance difference was found between visual and tactile & visual in the directional task. We conclude that the tactile & visual configuration may allow operators to choose a strategy in which perceptual and cognitive resources are better utilized.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages1644-1648
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2012
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: 22 Oct 201226 Oct 2012

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period22/10/1226/10/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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