A cross-cultural analysis of posthumous reproduction: The significance of the gender and margins-of-life perspectives

Yael Hashiloni-Dolev, Silke Schicktanz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The scholarly discussion of posthumous reproduction (PHR) focuses on informed consent and the welfare of the future child, for the most part overlooking cultural differences between societies. Based on a cross-cultural comparison of legal and regulatory documents, analysis of pivotal cases and study of scholarly and media discussions in Israel and Germany, this paper analyses the relevant ethical and policy issues, and questions how cultural differences shape the practice of PHR. The findings challenge the common classifications of PHR by highlighting the gender perspective and adding brain-dead pregnant women to the debate. Based on this study's findings, four neglected cultural factors affecting social attitudes towards PHR are identified: (i) the relationship between the pregnant woman and her future child; (ii) what constitutes the beginning of life; (iii) what constitutes dying; and (iv) the social agent(s) seeking to have the future child. The paper argues that PHR can be better understood by adding the gender and margins-of-life perspectives, and that future ethical and practical discussions of this issue could benefit from the criteria emerging from this cross-cultural analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-32
Number of pages12
JournalReproductive Biomedicine and Society Online
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Germany
  • Israel
  • brain death
  • ethics
  • gender
  • posthumous reproduction

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A cross-cultural analysis of posthumous reproduction: The significance of the gender and margins-of-life perspectives'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this