A fifth nonprofit regime? Revisiting social origins theory using Jewish associational life as a New State Model

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Abstract

In their social origins theory, Salamon and Anheier demonstrated the need to consider the historical past of societies in order to trace additional factors that motivate and shape the scope and nature of the third sector. This article elaborates the social origins approach to adjust it to a wider spectrum of states and nations and to additional historical experiences. It sheds light on societies that achieved independence after 1945 and went through a process of decolonization. In these countries, social structures and relations with governing authorities were different from the European and North American patterns that inspired the social origins approach. Taken together, such societies suggest an additional theoretical framework-one that explains the structure and characteristics of the third sector in new states in the light of their distinctive historical experience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)627-642
Number of pages16
JournalNonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2009

Keywords

  • Third sector and decolonization
  • Third sector in new states
  • Third sector in transitional periods
  • Thirds sector in traditional societies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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