A non-invasive method for measuring inspiratory muscle fatigue during progressive isocapnic hyperventilation in man

Daphna Vilozni, Ephraim Bar-Yishay, Caroline S. Beardsmore, Mara Shochina, Eliana Wolf, Simon Godfrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Eleven normal adults each performed a ten minute progressive isocapnic hyperventilation (PIHV) test in which ventilatory levels were increased every two minutes. All subjects exhibited mechanical fatigue by failing to maintain the target of 80% of maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV). The mean ventilation at this level was 67.5±1.4 %MVV. This fatigue was accompanied by a fall in transdiaphragmatic pressure. During the test the EMG of the sternomastoid (SM) was monitored by surface electrodes and was analyzed using fast-fourier transform. The centroid frequency (Fc) fell as ventilation increased, and correlated negatively with the inability to achive target ventilation (r=-0.99, p<0.015). Five subjects performed the test while the diaphragmatic EMG was recorded from an oesophageal electrode (DIes) and from surface electrodes (DIs). The Fc of DIes fell with increasing ventilation levels (r=-0.95, p<0.05) and there was a correlation beween the Fc changes of both DIes and the SM (r=0.92, p<0.001). The Fc of DIs did not correlate with either mechanical performance or the Fc of DIes, because of contamination of surface signals by signals from expiratory muscles. It is concluded that the PIHV along with surface monitoring of EMG activity from the sternomastoid can serve as a non-invasive method for evaluating inspiratory muscle fatigue.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-439
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 1987
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Centroid frequency
  • Diaphragm
  • Electromyography
  • Sternomastoid

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