A rational-emotive group intervention for preventing and coping with stress among safety officers

Talma Kushnir, Ruth Malkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

A stress management and prevention workshop for nonclinical industrial workers using rational-emotive principles with 18 months followup is reported. Twenty-two senior safety officers participated in an intervention program of five weekly meetings aimed at improving cognitive skills and assertiveness mainly by decreasing irrational thought processes. We hypothesized an increase in assertiveness, and a decrease in irrational beliefs, and emotional and cognitive stress symptoms (manifested in somatic complaints and cognitive weariness). Assertiveness improved and somatic complaints and irrationality decreased in the short term. Eighteen months later, cognitive weariness was also reduced. The other improvements were still evident, but not to the same extent as short-term effects. Although the workshop improved rationality, further practice would be needed in the behavioral aspect of stress prevention to achieve long-term improvements in assertiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-206
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Rational - Emotive and Cognitive - Behavior Therapy
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • RET
  • Safety officers
  • assertiveness
  • cognitive weariness
  • stress

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