Abnormal growth and feeding behavior persist after removal of upper airway obstruction in juvenile rats

Mohammad H. Assadi, Elena Shknevsky, Yael Segev, Ariel Tarasiuk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pediatric obstructive sleep-disordered breathing is associated with growth retardation, but also with obesity that has a tendency to persist following treatment. We investigated the effect of upper airways obstruction (AO) and of obstruction removal (OR) in juvenile rats on gut-derived ghrelin and related hypothalamic factors, feeding, and growth hormone (GH) homeostasis. Here, we show that after seven weeks of AO, animals gained less weight compared to controls, despite an increase in food intake due to elevated ghrelin and hypothalamic feeding factors. OR rats who had complete restoration of tracheal diameter, consumed more food due to increased ghrelin and exhibited growth retardation due to deregulation of GH homeostasis. This study is the first to show dysregulation of the hormonal axes controlling feeding behavior and growth that are not fully restored following OR. Thus, surgical treatment by itself may not be sufficient to prevent post-surgical increased food intake and growth retardation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2730
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2017

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