Absorbed in sleep: Dissociative absorption as a predictor of sleepiness following sleep deprivation in two high-functioning samples

Nirit Soffer-Dudek, Leah Shelef, Idit Oz, Anna Levkovsky, Ifaat Erlich, Shirley Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

In recent years, a labile sleep-wake cycle has been implicated as a cause for dissociative experiences, and studies show that dissociation is elevated following sleep deprivation. Dissociative individuals may find it harder to regulate sleepiness in the face of sleep disruption. Although there is significant variability in reactions to sleep deprivation, research on trait predictors is scarce. The present study examined the ability of trait dissociation to prospectively predict sleepiness following sleep loss and recovery sleep. Two high-functioning samples, namely, Remotely Piloted Aircraft officers (N = 29) and Air Force jet pilots (N = 57) completed state and trait questionnaires assessing sleep and dissociation before and after full or partial sleep loss. Dissociative absorption was a consistent predictor of an increase in sleepiness following sleep loss and following recovery sleep, controlling for baseline sleepiness levels. We discuss the findings in light of a difficulty to regulate and monitor consciousness states.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-170
Number of pages10
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume48
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • Absorption
  • Attention
  • Consciousness states
  • Dissociation
  • Pilots
  • Recovery sleep
  • Regulation
  • Sleep deprivation
  • Sleep-wake
  • Sleepiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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