Agism and burnout among nurses in long-term care facilities in Israel

Esther Iecovich, Michal Avivi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The extent to which agism and professional qualifications are associated with nurses' burnout in long-term care facilities for older adults has been barely examined. This study is aimed to examine the extent to which agism, professional education, and geriatric training explain work burnout. Method: The study included a convenience sample of 154 nurses working in 17 long-term care facilities in the Tel Aviv area in Israel. To examine agism, Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People Scale was used, and to probe burnout, the Maslach Burnout Inventory was used. Results: Overall burnout was significantly explained by agism, nurses' professional education, length of working as a nurse, and type of facility ownership. When examining each dimension of burnout, agism was a significant predictor of depersonalization and personal achievement. Conclusion: Agism plays a role in overall burnout. Therefore, training programs that can combat agism can reduce burnout of nurses in long-term care facilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)327-335
Number of pages9
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • agism
  • burnout
  • disabled older adults
  • long-term care
  • nurses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatric Mental Health
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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