Alleviating debilitating photophobia and secondary exotropia caused by increased straylight by widening a small posterior capsulotomy

Ruth Lapid-Gortzak, Ivanka J.E. Van Der Meulen, Carla P. Nieuwendaal, Tom J.T.P. Van Den Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a patient with complaints of photophobia and an ocular deviation, straylight was found to be increased to 1.61 (log[s]), which is 5 times the normal value. The only relative clinical finding was the edge of a too small posterior capsulotomy. Visual acuity was normal. Six weeks after the posterior capsulotomy was widened to a diameter of 6.0 mm with a neodymium:YAG laser, the symptoms were resolved and the patient was satisfied. Straylight may manifest clinically as complaints of photophobia. Straylight increase, which can be related to slitlamp findings, may lead to an interventional decision. Our clinical decision-making was also guided by straylight measurements and proved to be crucial in resolving the patient's complaints. More study of clinical situations in which straylight measurement can be used is needed. Financial Disclosure: No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Additional disclosures are in the footnotes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-414
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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