An Open-Label, Proof-of-Concept Study Assessing the Effects of Bromelain-Based Enzymatic Debridement on Biofilm and Microbial Loads in Patients With Venous Leg Ulcers and Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Robert J. Snyder, Adam J. Singer, Cyaandi R. Dove, Stephen Heisler, Howard Petusevsky, Garth James, Elinor de Lancey Pulcini, Aya Ben Yaakov, Lior Rosenberg, Edward Grant, Yaron Shoham

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Background. Most chronic wounds contain biofilm, and debridement remains the centerpiece of treatment. Enzymatic debridement is an effective tool in removing nonviable tissue, however, there is little evidence supporting its effect on planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Objective. This study evaluated the effects of a novel BBD agent on removal of nonviable tissue, biofilm, and microbial loads in patients with chronic ulcers. Materials and Methods. Twelve patients with DFU or VLU were treated with up to 8 once-daily applications of BBD and then followed for an additional 2 weeks. Punch biopsy specimens were collected and analyzed for biofilm, and fluorescence imaging was used to measure bacterial load. Results. Ten patients completed treatment, and 7 achieved complete debridement within a median of 2 applications (range, 2–8). By the end of the 2-week follow-up period, the mean ± SD reduction in wound area was 35% ± 38. In all 6 patients who were positive for biofilm at baseline, the biofilm was reduced to single individual or no detected microorganisms by the end of treatment. Red fluorescence for Staphylococcus aureus decreased from a mean of 1.09 cm2 ± 0.58 before treatment to 0.39 cm2 ± 0.25 after treatment. BBD was safe and well tolerated. Conclusion. Preliminary data suggest that BBD is safe and that it can be used to effectively debride DFU and VLU, reduce biofilm and planktonic bacterial load, and promote reduction in wound size.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)E414-E419
    JournalWounds
    Volume35
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1 Jan 2023

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General Medicine

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