Antecedents and consequences of maternal involvement in children's homework: A longitudinal analysis

Iris Levin, Rachel Levy-Shiff, Talya Appelbaum-Peled, Idit Katz, Maya Komar, Nachshon Meiran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

103 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many parents are concerned with the desirability of helping their children with homework. Mothers and their children's teachers filled out questionnaires twice, when children were in 1st and 3rd grade. The children did so in 3rd grade. Correlation matrices were analyzed by a Linear-Structural Relations model (LISREL). The predictions of 3rd grade by 1st grade variables were tested by hierarchical regressions. Maternal help with homework had no effect on the child's academic achievement. Mothers of weaker students helped more with homework, particularly in the 1st grade. In both grades, maternal help was related to her pedagogical belief in the value of helping and to her personal gratification from helping. Helping increased maternal emotional costs and caused tensions between her and the child, particularly when the latter was a poor student. Helping decreased with grade, as did maternal gratification and pedagogical belief.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-227
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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