Are ethnic minority adolescents at risk for problem behaviour? Acculturation and intergenerational acculturation discrepancies in early adolescence

Naama Atzaba-Poria, Alison Pike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study investigated the adjustment of Indian adolescents living in Britain as well as the links between parents' and adolescents' acculturation styles and the adolescents' problem behaviours. The sample consisted of 68 young adolescents (31 Indian and 37 English) between the ages of 10 and 13, and their mothers and fathers. Mothers, fathers and adolescents reported about their own acculturation style, and parents also reported on their adolescents' problem behaviour. Overall Indian adolescents exhibited more internalizing problems than did their English peers. Furthermore, within the Indian group, the more Westernized mothers were in their acculturation style, the higher the level of externalizing problem behaviour their adolescents exhibited. In addition, the more traditional adolescents were the more internalizing problems they displayed. Finally, Indian adolescents experienced more internalizing problems when their parents were more Western or less traditional than the adolescents themselves. These findings highlight the importance of examining not only parental acculturation style, but also the parent-child acculturation discrepancy as a risk factor for problem behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)527-541
Number of pages15
JournalBritish Journal of Developmental Psychology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

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