Are there disparities in acute stroke treatment between the Jewish and Arab populations in Israel? Results from the National Acute Stroke Israeli registry

Naaem Simaan, Andrei Filioglo, Asaf Honig, Anat Horev, David Orion, Natan M. Bornstein, Gregory Telman, David Tanne, Guy Raphaeli, Jacob Amsalem, Neuman Hadar, Reem Habib-Simaan, Jose E. Cohen, Ronen R. Leker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: According to the latest reported data from the National Acute Stroke Israeli Survey (NASIS), around 18,000 strokes occur annually in Israel. Data regarding disparities in stroke care between the Jewish and the Arab populations in Israel are lacking. Aims: We wished to compare demographics, comorbidities, stroke characteristics and outcomes between Jewish and Arab stroke patients in Israel that were acutely treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) and/or endovascular thrombectomy (EVT), in order to test if there are disparities or any ethnic-specific parameters. Methods: The National Acute Stroke Israeli registry of patients undergoing revascularization (NASIS-REVASC) prospectively enrolled patients in six comprehensive stroke centers between 1/2014 and 3/2016. In this observational research, we compared demographics, comorbidities, time metrics, stroke characteristics and outcomes between Jewish and Arab patients enrolled. Results: NASIS-REVASC included 1432 patients out of which 143 (10%) were of Arab ethnicity and 1289 (90%) of Jewish ethnicity. Arab patients were significantly younger (66 ± 14 vs. 73 ± 29, p = 0·004), exhibited higher rates of smoking and diabetes (31% vs. 18% and 57% vs. 34%, p < 0·001 for both), and were less often treated with systemic thrombolysis (48% vs. 59%, p = 0·012). However, the rates of any interventional treatment with either intravenous thrombolysis or endovascular thrombectomy as well as the rates of favorable outcomes and mortality were comparable between groups. Conclusions: Despite several baseline differences between Arab and Jewish Israeli stroke patients, treatment allocations, survival and functional outcomes were similar indicating lack of disparity in stroke care among patients treated acutely with IVT and/or EVT in Israel. Data access statement: Full data is available following a formal request to the NASIS-REVASC registry at the Israeli Health Ministry.

Original languageEnglish
Article number117357
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume423
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Apr 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • Favorable outcome
  • Revascularization
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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