Assessment in mathematics: a study on teachers’ practices in times of pandemic

Annalisa Cusi, Florian Schacht, Gilles Aldon, Osama Swidan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lockdowns imposed by many countries on their populations at the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis forced teachers to adapt quickly and without adequate preparation to distance teaching. In this paper, we focus on one of the most formidable challenges that teachers faced during the lockdowns and even in the post-lockdown emergency period, namely, developing assessment that maintains the pedagogical continuity that educational institutions typically require. Based on the results of a previous study, focused on the analysis of answers to an open-ended questionnaire administered to a population of 700 teachers from France, Germany, Israel and Italy, a semi-structured interview series was designed and implemented by the authors of this paper with a small group of teachers. The transcripts of these interviews were analysed according to the interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology, with the aim of investigating teachers’ own perspectives on the following: (a) the difficulties with which they had to contend, with respect to the question of assessment; (b) the techniques adopted to deal with these difficulties; and (c) the ways in which the lockdown experience could affect the future evolution of teachers’ assessment practices. This analysis supported us in formulating hypotheses concerning the possible long-term effects of lockdown on modes of assessment in mathematics.

Original languageEnglish
JournalZDM - International Journal on Mathematics Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • COVID-19 pandemic
  • Distance teaching
  • Formative assessment
  • Meta-didactical transposition
  • Praxeologies
  • Summative assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Mathematics (all)

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