Association between hair loss severity and risk for later mental health problems in women irradiated for tinea capitis in childhood

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

Introduction: Hair loss resulting from childhood irradiation for
tinea capitis has been linked to mental health effects in women.
However, the association of hair loss severity with mental health in
this population is unknown.
Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the association
between hair loss severity and mental health outcomes in women
irradiated for tinea capitis in childhood and to identify contributing
factors to these outcomes.
Methods: Medical records, held at the archives of Israel National
Center for Compensation of Scalp Ringworm Victims, were retrospectively
reviewed for 2509 women who received compensation
for full or partial alopecia resulting from irradiation in childhood
for tinea capitis. Mental health outcomes were determined by the
number of mental health conditions reported.
Results: Among women with high hair loss levels, risk was increased
for a range ofmental health problems, including depression symptoms,
emotional distress, social anxiety, lowself-esteem, and suicidal ideation.
Hair loss severity emerged as a significant predictor of mental health,
adding to the effects of other predictors such as family, and social and
physical health problems. Effects of hair loss severity on mental health
outcomes were mediated by women’s negative social experiences.
Conclusions: Hair loss severity is a significant risk factor for mental
health problems in women irradiated for tinea capitis in childhood.
Further research is needed to assess mental health risks among
women with severe hair loss associated with additional diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S179–S179
JournalEuropean Psychiatry
Volume64
Issue numberS1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

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