Associations between changes in City and address specific temperature and QT interval - The VA normative aging study

Amar J. Mehta, Itai Kloog, Antonella Zanobetti, Brent A. Coull, David Sparrow, Pantel Vokonas, Joel Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The underlying mechanisms of the association between ambient temperature and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are not well understood, particularly for daily temperature variability. We evaluated if daily mean temperature and standard deviation of temperature was associated with heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) duration, a marker of ventricular repolarization in a prospective cohort of older men.

Methods: This longitudinal analysis included 487 older men participating in the VA Normative Aging Study with up to three visits between 2000-2008 (n=743). We analyzed associations between QTc and moving averages (1-7, 14, 21, and 28 days) of the 24-hour mean and standard deviation of temperature as measured from a local weather monitor, and the 24-hour mean temperature estimated from a spatiotemporal prediction model, in time-varying linear mixed-effect regression. Effect modification by season, diabetes, coronary heart disease, obesity, and age was also evaluated.

Results: Higher mean temperature as measured from the local monitor, and estimated from the prediction model, was associated with longer QTc at moving averages of 21 and 28 days. Increased 24-hr standard deviation of temperature was associated with longer QTc at moving averages from 4 and up to 28 days; a 1.9uC interquartile range increase in 4-day moving average standard deviation of temperature was associated with a 2.8 msec (95%CI: 0.4, 5.2) longer QTc. Associations between 24-hr standard deviation of temperature and QTc were stronger in colder months, and in participants with diabetes and coronary heart disease.

Conclusion/Significance: In this sample of older men, elevated mean temperature was associated with longer QTc, and increased variability of temperature was associated with longer QTc, particularly during colder months and among individuals with diabetes and coronary heart disease. These findings may offer insight of an important underlying mechanism of temperature-related cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in an older population.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere106258
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 19 Sep 2014

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