Associations between prenatal traffic-related air pollution exposure and birth weight: Modification by sex and maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index

Ashwini Lakshmanan, Yueh Hsiu Mathilda Chiu, Brent A. Coull, Allan C. Just, Sarah L. Maxwell, Joel Schwartz, Alexandros Gryparis, Itai Kloog, Rosalind J. Wright, Robert O. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Prenatal traffic-related air pollution exposure is linked to adverse birth outcomes. However, modifying effects of maternal body mass index (BMI) and infant sex remain virtually unexplored. Objectives: We examined whether associations between prenatal air pollution and birth weight differed by sex and maternal BMI in 670 urban ethnically mixed mother-child pairs. Methods: Black carbon (BC) levels were estimated using a validated spatio-temporal land-use regression (LUR) model; fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was estimated using a hybrid LUR model incorporating satellite-derived Aerosol Optical Depth measures. Using stratified multivariable-adjusted regression analyses, we examined whether associations between prenatal air pollution and calculated birth weight for gestational age (BWGA) z-scores varied by sex and maternal pre-pregnancy BMI. Results: Median birth weight was 3.3±0.6kg; 33% of mothers were obese (BMI ≥30kg/m3). In stratified analyses, the association between higher PM2.5 and lower birth weight was significant in males of obese mothers (-0.42 unit of BWGA z-score change per IQR increase in PM2.5, 95%CI: -0.79 to -0.06) ( PM2.5×sex×obesity Pinteraction=0.02). Results were similar for BC models (Pinteraction=0.002). Conclusions: Associations of prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and reduced birth weight were most evident in males born to obese mothers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-277
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume137
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2015

Keywords

  • Birth weight
  • Body mass index
  • Prenatal exposure
  • Sex
  • Traffic-related air pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • General Environmental Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Associations between prenatal traffic-related air pollution exposure and birth weight: Modification by sex and maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this