Associations between subsequent hospitalizations and primary ambulatory services utilization within the first year after acute myocardial infarction and long-term mortality

Ygal Plakht, Dan Greenberg, Harel Gilutz, Jonathan Eli Arbelle, Arthur Shiyovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Healthcare resource utilization peaks throughout the first year following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Data linking the former and outcomes are sparse. We evaluated the associations between subsequent length of in-hospital stay (SLOS) and primary ambulatory visits (PAV) within the first year after AMI and long-term mortality. This retrospective analysis included patients who were discharged following an AMI. Study groups: low (0–1 days), intermediate (2–7) and high (≥8 days) SLOS; low (<10) and high (≥10 visits) PAV, throughout the first post-AMI year. All-cause mortality was set as the primary outcome. Overall, 8112 patients were included: 55.2%, 23.4% and 21.4% in low, intermediate and high SLOS groups respectively; 26.0% and 74.0% in low and high-PAV groups. Throughout the follow-up period (up to 18 years), 49.6% patients died. Multivariable analysis showed that an increased SLOS (Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.313 and HR = 1.714 for intermediate and high vs. low groups respectively) and a reduced number of PAV (HR = 1.24 for low vs. high groups) were independently associated with an increased risk for mortality (p < 0.001 for each). Long-term mortality following AMI is associated with high hospital and low primary ambulatory services utilization throughout the first-year post-discharge. Measures focusing on patients with increased SLOS and reduced PAV should be considered to improve patient outcomes.

Original languageEnglish GB
Article number2528
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • Healthcare resource utilization
  • Mortality
  • Prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

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