Asymmetric effects of false positive and false negative indications on the verification of alerts in different risk conditions

Rebecca Wiczorek, Joachim Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Indications from alerts or alarm systems can be the trigger for decisions, or they can elicit further information search. We report an experiment on the tendency to collect additional information after receiving system indications. We varied the proclivity of the alarm system towards false positive or false negative indications and the perceived risk of the situation. Results showed that false alarm-prone systems led to more frequent re-checking following both alarms and non-alarms in the high risk condition, whereas miss-prone systems led to high re-checking rates only for non-alarms, representing an asymmetry effect. Increasing the risk led to more re-checks with all alarm systems, but it had a stronger impact in the false alarm-prone condition. Results regarding the relation of risk and the asymmetry effect of false negative and false positive indications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-292
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes
EventHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society 2016 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2016 - Washington, United States
Duration: 19 Sep 201623 Sep 2016

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