Atrial fibrillation and long-term prognosis in patients hospitalized for heart failure: Results from heart failure survey in Israel (HFSIS)

Avraham Shotan, Moshe Garty, David S. Blondhein, Simcha R. Meisel, Basil S. Lewis, Michael Shochat, Ehud Grossman, Avi Porath, Valentina Boyko, Reuven Zimlichman, Abraham Caspi, Shmuel Gottlieb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

AimsAtrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) commonly coexist, and each adversely affects the other. The aim of the study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of AF and its subtypes on management, and early and long-term outcome of hospitalized HF patients.Methods and resultsData were prospectively collected on HF patients hospitalized in all public hospitals in Israel as part of a national survey (HFSIS). Atrial fibrillation patients were subdivided into intermittent and chronic AF subgroups. During March-April 2003, we enrolled 4102 HF patients, of whom 1360 (33.2) had AF [600 (44.1) intermittent, 562 (41.3) chronic]. Patients with AF were older (76.9 ± 10.5 vs. 71.7 ± 12.6 years, P = 0.0001), males, with preserved LV systolic function. Crude mortality rates for AF patients were progressively and consistently higher during hospitalization and during the 4-year follow-up period, especially in the chronic AF group (P = 0.0001). After covariate adjustment, AF was associated with increased 1-year mortality [HR 1.19, 95 CI (1.03-1.36)].ConclusionAF was present in a third of hospitalized HF patients, and identified a population with increased mortality risk, largely due to co-morbidities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-317
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Heart Journal
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Heart failure
  • Prognosis

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