Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and developmental right- hemisphere syndrome: Congruence and incongruence of cognitive and behavioral aspects of attention

Yael E. Landau, Varda Gross-Tsur, Judith G. Auerbach, Jaap D. Van Der Meere, Ruth S. Shalev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied clinical aspects of attention in three groups: children with developmental right-hemisphere syndrome and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), children with ADHD only, and normal controls. The three groups (N = 54) were case-matched for age, sex, IQ, hand dominance, and socioeconomic status. ADHD was diagnosed clinically using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-III-Revised criteria and the Conners' Abbreviated Teacher Questionnaire. Additional aspects of attention and behavior were measured by the Child Behavior Checklist, a low-cognitive-load continuous performance task, and the visual target cancellation test (paper and pencil). Although the Child Behavior Checklist profile of attentional deficits in the two clinical groups was similar, we found that the developmental right-hemisphere syndrome group was more severely impaired on parameters of attention measured by the continuous performance task and visual target cancellation test than the children with ADHD. We conclude that the profile of attentional deficits in developmental right-hemisphere syndrome is different than that seen in children with ADHD only, possibly reflecting disparate neurologic underpinnings for the two syndromes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-303
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

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