Attitudes toward war and peace and their relations with anxiety reactions among adolescents living in a conflictual area

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined attitudes toward war and peace during a violent conflict and their relationships with anxiety reactions. We aimed to find out if attitudes toward the conflict in general or attitudes toward the specific operation are linked to anxiety reactions during a stressful situation and if a personal coping resource mediates the relationships between these attitudes and anxiety. Data were gathered on November 2012 from 78 Jewish adolescents living in southern Israel who were exposed to missile attacks during a military operation. Adolescents filled out self-report questionnaires which included socio-demographic characteristics; attitudes toward the military operation; ways to resolve the Israeli–Palestinian conflict; and sense of coherence and state anxiety. Results showed that most of the adolescents believed that a military operation would diminish the missile attacks to some extent or totally. Overall, adolescents who believed that a military operation would resolve the situation for a limited time were more anxious, while those who believed that it would open the opportunity for negotiation with the enemy, socialization, education, and mutual interest were less anxious. Results are discussed against the background of the meanings of growing up in the shadow of intractable violent conflict.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-79
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Youth Studies
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • attitudes
  • coping resources
  • mental health
  • politics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (all)
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Attitudes toward war and peace and their relations with anxiety reactions among adolescents living in a conflictual area'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this