Automatic retrieval of newly instructed cue-task associations seen in task-conflict effects in the first trial after cue-task instructions

Nachshon Meiran, Maayan Pereg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Novel stimulus-response associations are retrieved automatically even without prior practice. Is this true for novel cue-task associations? The experiment involved miniblocks comprising three phases and task switching. In the INSTRUCTION phase, two new stimuli (or familiar cues) were arbitrarily assigned as cues for up-down/right-left tasks performed on placeholder locations. In the UNIVALENT phase, there was no task cue since placeholder's location afforded one task but the placeholders were the stimuli that we assigned as task cues for the following BIVALENT phase (involving target locations affording both tasks). Thus, participants held the novel cue-task associations in memory while executing the UNIVALENT phase. Results show poorer performance in the first univalent trial when the placeholder was associated with the opposite task (incompatible) than when it was compatible, an effect that was numerically larger with newly instructed cues than with familiar cues. These results indicate automatic retrieval of newly instructed cue-task associations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-48
Number of pages12
JournalExperimental Psychology
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017

Keywords

  • Intention-based reflexivity
  • NEXT paradigm
  • Procedural working-memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Automatic retrieval of newly instructed cue-task associations seen in task-conflict effects in the first trial after cue-task instructions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this