Automaticity and consciousness: Is perceiving the word necessary for reading it?

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36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Definitions of automaticity imply insensitivity of the Stroop effect to conscious perceiving of the word. Subjects in the Stroop task reported the meaning of the stimulus word (in addition to its color) in 7% of the trials. The magnitude of the Stroop effect in these trials was correlated with subjects' ability to report the stimulus meaning. Furthermore, the effect was absent when subjects failed to report the stimulus meaning. These findings challenge the assumption that automatic processing is unconscious. A distinction between automatic and non-automatic processing in terms of modes of consciousness is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-448
Number of pages20
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychology
Volume110
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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