Back-projection cortical potential imaging: A sensitivity study

Dror Haor, Reuven Shavit, Ziv Peremen, Yaki Stern, Amir Geva

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In this work we inspect and validate the back-projection cortical potential imaging (BP-CPI) technique. The BP-CPI is a relatively new tool which estimates highly detailed cortical potential distributions from the smeared measured EEG spatial signals. The testing of this tool includes the study of the BP-CPI sensitivity to real-life interferences and errors, such as electrodes noise, displacement errors, and the number of electrodes. This was done through a series of computer simulations (performed using Sim4Life by ZMT) solving scalp and cortical potential distributions excited by three source configurations. Examining the results in this sensitivity study, it is clear that the BP-CPI technique provides a useful tool for recovering the cortical potential underlying within the subject head.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2017 IEEE International Conference on Microwaves, Antennas, Communications and Electronic Systems, COMCAS 2017
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1-5
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781538631690
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Jun 2017
Event2017 IEEE International Conference on Microwaves, Antennas, Communications and Electronic Systems, COMCAS 2017 - Tel-Aviv, Israel
Duration: 13 Nov 201715 Nov 2017

Publication series

Name2017 IEEE International Conference on Microwaves, Antennas, Communications and Electronic Systems, COMCAS 2017
Volume2017-November

Conference

Conference2017 IEEE International Conference on Microwaves, Antennas, Communications and Electronic Systems, COMCAS 2017
Country/TerritoryIsrael
CityTel-Aviv
Period13/11/1715/11/17

Keywords

  • Back-projection
  • Cortical potential imaging
  • Inverse problem
  • Simulative validation
  • Surface Laplacian

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