Black-bellied sandgrouse (Pterocles orientalis) and pin-tailed sandgrouse (Pterocles alchata): closely related species with differing bioenergetic adaptations to arid zones

S. A. Hinsley, P. N. Ferns, D. H. Thomas, B. Pinshow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Black-bellied sandgrouse had a mean resting metabolic rate (RMR) similar to the allometric prediction (5.53 mWg-1 by day, 5.04 mWg-1 at night; 97% and 110% of allometric prediction, respectively), whereas mean RMR in pin-tailed sandgrouse was lower than predicted (4.04 mWg-1 by day; 62% of allometric prediction). Pin-tailed sandgrouse was the better thermoregulator, especially at high temperatures, with a well-developed evaporative cooling ability. At 40°C, evaporative heat loss (He) dissipated 89% of metabolic heat production (Hm), and at 25°C, He was 152% of the allometric prediction. This compares to 53% at 40°C and 101% at 25°C for black-bellied sandgrouse. However, both species had high lower and upper critical temperatures, and metabolism at high ambient temperatures (Ta's) was relatively insensitive to increasing temperature. Black-bellied sandgrouse showed greatly increased thermal conductance (Cd) at high temperatures facilitating nonevaporative heat loss. This species also demonstrated labile body temperature Tb) especially at low Ta, allowing energy savings under cooler conditions. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-42
Number of pages23
JournalPhysiological Zoology
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology (medical)

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