Book Review of Disability and Information Technology: A Comparative Study in Media Regulation, by Eliza Varney

Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Arts/Article review

Abstract

"Old media" policy has long adopted a top-down approach to access. The minimum requirement for technical know-how to operate such technologies as television and the telephone resulted in the assumption that if the technology were made available, it would be used. "New media," however, operate in a different paradigm, one that calls for more active participation on behalf of individual users in order to be able to fully participate in the information society, and has even been described by Manuel Castells as "mass self communications." As a result, while it has been a goal of national information policy in developed and developing countries to enhance the population's online connectivity through enhancement of access, much of that policy looks at the aggregate, and measures success in national averages, disregarding "pockets" of cultural and personal obstacles for communicating, varieties of level and quality of service, and diversity in service offerings. The result is that policy addresses change in a superficial manner and does not provide solutions to the truly needy. [from the review]
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-159, 168
Number of pages3
JournalCommunications & Strategies
Issue number96
StatePublished - 2014

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