Bromelain-based enzymatic debridement of chronic wounds: A preliminary report

Yaron Shoham, Yuval Krieger, Eran Tamir, Eldad Silberstein, Alexander Bogdanov-Berezovsky, Josef Haik, Lior Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sharp debridement is currently considered most effective for debridement of chronic wounds; however, some patients do not have access to or cannot be treated by surgical methods. This study was designed to provide a first impression of the safety and efficacy of bromelain-based enzymatic debridement of chronic wounds. Two consecutive single-arm studies assessing the enzymatic debridement efficacy of a concentrate of proteolytic enzymes enriched in bromelain in chronic wounds was conducted in 2 medical centres. Patients were treated with up to 11 consecutive 4-hour enzymatic debridement sessions and then treated until wound closure. Twenty-four patients with chronic wounds of different aetiologies were enrolled. All wounds achieved an average of 68% ± 30% debridement in an average of 3.5 ± 2.8 enzymatic debridement 4-hour sessions. Seventeen responding wounds (venous, diabetic, pressure, and post-traumatic aetiologies) achieved an average 85% ± 12% debridement in 3.2 ± 2.5 applications. Seven non-responding wounds (arterial and post-surgical aetiologies) achieved an average 26% ± 13% debridement in 4.3 ± 3.5 applications. No treatment-related serious adverse events were observed, and the only adverse event attributed to the enzymatic debridement was pain. These preliminary results indicate the potential safety and efficacy of bromelain-based enzymatic debridement in chronic wounds. Larger controlled studies are needed to further investigate this indication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)769-775
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Wound Journal
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • a concentrate of proteolytic enzymes enriched in bromelain
  • bromelain-based debridement
  • chronic wounds
  • enzymatic debridement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Bromelain-based enzymatic debridement of chronic wounds: A preliminary report'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this