Building in Resilience: Long-term Considerations in the Design and Production of Residential Buildings in Israel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Threats to national security, such as that against critical infrastructures not only stem from man-made acts but also from natural hazards. Hurricane Katrina (2005), Blackout Canada-US (2003), Fukushima (2011), Hurricane Sandy (2012), and Alberta floods (2013) are examples that highlight the vulnerability of critical infrastructures and buildings to different kinds of disasters. In this chapter we describe the need for an integrated approach to building design which considers the possible synergies between structural durability and energy efficiency. Developing ideas from previous work regarding architectural awareness of earthquake resistance, we introduce three levels of integration needed when designing for resilience: (1) integration in multi-disciplinary design teams; (2) integration in the design process, i.e. integrated design or co-design, and (3) integration of long-term and short-term considerations. The aim of this chapter is to examine barriers to the integrated design of resilient buildings by looking at disincentives for non-linear co-design processes along the extended building supply chain.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDisaster Management: Enabling Resilience
PublisherSpringer
Pages65-90
Number of pages26
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Social Networks
PublisherSpringer

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