Cervical insufficiency a prologue for future pelvic organ prolapse?

Anastasia Bendet, Elad Leron, Shaked Yarza, Adi Weintraub, Offer Erez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Preliminary evidence suggests that women with cervical oss insufficiency may have an increased risk to develop pelvic organ prolapse later in life, suggesting a common underlying collagen-oriented mechanism. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the association between cervical oss insufficiency and the subsequent development of pelvic organ prolapse. Study design: A matched, case–control study, including women who delivered at the Soroka University Medical Center. Cases were women diagnosed or treated with pelvic organ prolapse (n = 1463), and controls were a representative sample of women of the same age group without pelvic organ prolapse (n = 5637). The association between pelvic organ prolapse and prior preterm birth was tested. Univariate analysis was performed using a conditional logistic regression to assess the association between preterm labor and pelvic organ prolapse. Statistically and clinically significant variables in the univariate analysis were included in the multivariable regression. Results: The rate of spontaneous preterm birth did not differ between the study groups [pelvic organ prolapse − 4.0% (59/1463) vs. non- pelvic organ prolapse − 4.9% (276/5637), p = 0.16]. The median number of preterm births was higher among women without pelvic organ prolapse (controls) than in those with pelvic organ prolapse (cases) (p = 0.004). Among those who delivered preterm, the individual proportion of preterm deliveries was higher among the controls’ group (p = 0.03). Similarly, the rate of cesarean deliveries was also higher among the controls group (p = 0.003). The rate of small for gestational age neonates was higher in the controls group (p = 0.0007), while that of large for gestational age neonates was higher in the case group (p = 0.02). In the univariate analysis, birthweight, vaginal delivery, and prior surgery were associated with subsequent development of pelvic organ prolapse. The multivariable analysis exhibited the same association- having birthweight, vaginal delivery, and all types of prior surgery independently associated with subsequent development of pelvic organ prolapse. Conclusions: Obstetrics characteristics associated with pelvic organ prolapse included vaginal delivery and birthweight along with non-obstetrical factors such as prior surgery. There was no association between preterm birth and subsequent development of pelvic organ prolapse. Our findings suggest that the effort during labor at term required for the delivery of appropriate for gestational age or large for gestational age newborns affects the pelvic floor and is a major contributor for the subsequent development of pelvic organ prolapse.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Birthweight
  • Cerclage
  • Cesarean section
  • Collagen
  • Hysterectomy
  • Large for gestational age (LGA)
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Pelvic reconstructive surgery
  • Preterm labor
  • Spontaneous parturition
  • Vaginal delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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