Changes in knowledge, attitudes, and work preferences following courses in gerontology among medical, nursing, and social work students

Sara Carmel, Julie Cwikel, David Galinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

109 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluated short- and long-term effects of courses in gerontology and geriatrics on changes in knowledge, attitudes, and work preferences among medical, nursing, and social work students in Israel. The results showed that nursing and social work students increased their knowledge measured by Palmore’s Facts on Aging Quiz. No significant changes were found in the level of knowledge of medical students and in the attitudes and work preferences of any of the studied groups. No correlation was found among knowledge, attitudes, and work preferences within each of the three groups, which implies that increased knowledge about the elderly does not necessarily lead to changes in negative attitudes and work preferences. Formal lectures appear to be a more effective way of transmitting knowledge than group discussions and contact with older persons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-342
Number of pages14
JournalEducational Gerontology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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