Circulating leptin levels in newborn rats: A significant post- natal developmental effect, independent of dietary polyunsaturated fat levels

Ruth Z. Birk, Karen S. Regan, Patsy M. Brannon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Leptin expression exhibits developmental and dietary regulation, but it is unknown whether there is an interaction of the regulation by dietary fat and postnatal development. The purpose of this study was to test the effect of different levels of dietary polyunsaturated fat on circulating leptin levels at different post-natal developmental stages. Pregnant (Sprague-Dawley) rats consumed from day 15 of pregnancy through day 9 of lactation a low fat, (11% of energy; LF) polyunsaturated safflower oil diet. From day 9 of lactation, dams and their respective pups were fed low, moderate (40% of energy; MF) or high (67% of energy; HF) polyunsaturated safflower oil diets to full maturation (56 days). Diets were iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous. Milk fatty acid content reflected the mothers and pups diet, with 15 to 100 fold less C10:0 and 2.6 to 3.3 fold more C18:2 in MF and HF groups compared to LF diet. In newborn rats through post-natal day 56, levels of polyunsaturated fat in mothers' milk and mothers/pups diet had no effect on the levels of circulating leptin. The post-natal development period significantly affected circulating leptin levels (p < 0.001, 15 days = 56 days > 21 days > 28 days). In summary, the developmental postnatal stage regulates leptin levels, independently of the polyunsaturated fat levels in the diet.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2761-2767
    Number of pages7
    JournalLife Sciences
    Volume73
    Issue number21
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 10 Oct 2003

    Keywords

    • Fat
    • Leptin
    • Polyunsaturated
    • Rat

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (all)
    • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (all)

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