Clarifying mastery-avoidance goals in high school: Distinguishing between intrapersonal and task-based standards of competence

Nir Madjar, Avi Kaplan, Michael Weinstock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

The definition, measurement, prevalence, and relations of mastery-avoidance goals with engagement outcomes are still under debate. Study 1 (n=256) aimed to investigate these issues among junior high and high school students in two domains. Findings indicated that students distinguished between the three commonly assessed achievement goals and mastery-avoidance goals. Moreover, students distinguished between the two standards conceived to underlie mastery-avoidance goals-task-mastery and intrapersonal competence. However, the task-mastery items failed to show reliability. Study 2 (n=118) aimed to replicate the results of Study 1 as well as to investigate the associations of mastery-avoidance goals with self-regulation strategies and affect in school. Intrapersonal mastery-avoidance goals were positively related to adaptive strategies and negatively with maladaptive strategies. Moreover, when combined with mastery-approach goals, intrapersonal mastery-avoidance goals enhanced students' reports of adaptive affect in school. The implications of these findings to theory, method, and future directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-279
Number of pages12
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Affect in school
  • Goal orientations
  • Mastery-avoidance
  • Self-regulated learning strategies

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