Coalition activity of social change organizations in a public campaign: The influence of motives, resources and processes on levels of activity

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12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article focuses on the ways that various factors, conditions and processes affected the creation of different levels of activity found in a coalition of 19 social change organizations that conducted a successful public campaign for tax reform in Israel during 1987-1988. Eight of the organizations were active on behalf of widows and disabled people; five represented low-income neighborhoods; two promoted child welfare and two dealt with women's issues. Other organizations were the National Social Worker's association, a senior citizen's organization and a peace advocacy organization. Members attributed high levels of coalition activity among organizations to a combination of the following factors: an internal organizational situation which enabled organizations to invest resources in the joint activity; a representative with resources that fit well with the chosen coalition strategy; and conditions and processes on the coalition level that enabled, and even encouraged, the use of the organization's resources during the period of the coalition activity. The research finds how campaign coalitions that consist of a diverse group of social change organizations are developed and sustained. This knowledge can improve planning and operating of successful social change coalitions.

Original languageEnglish GB
Pages (from-to)21-41
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Community Practice
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2001

Keywords

  • Coalition building
  • Coalitions
  • Organizational behavior
  • Public campaign
  • Social change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

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