Cognitive rigidity in unipolar depression and obsessive compulsive disorder: Examination of task switching, Stroop, working memory updating and post-conflict adaptation

Nachshon Meiran, Gary M. Diamond, Doron Toder, Boris Nemets

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

121 Scopus citations

Abstract

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and depressive rumination are both characterized by cognitive rigidity. We examined the performance of 17 patients (9 suffering from unipolar depression [UD] without OCD, and 8 suffering from OCD without UD), and 17 control participants matched on age, gender, language and education, on a battery covering the four main executive functions. Results indicated that, across both disorders, patients required more trials to adjust to single-task conditions after experiencing task switching, reflecting slow disengagement from switching mode, and showed abnormal post-conflict adaptation of processing mode following high conflict Stroop trials in comparison to controls. Rumination, which was elevated in UD and not in OCD, was associated with poor working memory updating and less task preparation. The results show that OCD and UD are associated with similar cognitive rigidity in the presently tested paradigms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-156
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume185
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Basal ganglia
  • Executive functions
  • Post-conflict adaptation
  • Reaction time
  • Rumination

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