Collapse and recovery of an upwelling-productive-ecosystem across the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction

Y. O. Rosenberg, S. Ashckenazi-Polivoda, S. Chin, Y. Bartov, N. R. Thibault, S. Feinstein, S. Abramovich, A. Amrani

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction (KPg, ~66.04 Ma) is the last large scale catastrophic event during which many marine and terrestrial taxa became extinct, while others rose to ecological dominance in the aftermath of the extinction. How the ecosystem recovered following the KPg mass extinction is a topic of intense debate. In the marine realm, the main dogma states that the ecosystem took millions of years to recover, and suffered from a reduction in either primary productivity or export of organic matter (OM) to the seafloor [1]. In contrast, a few recent studies suggest that the recovery period of the marine ecosystem was as short as a few hundred years [2]. Here we study a recently revealed stratigraphic rock section, drilled from the Golan basin, Israel. The paleolocation of the section was part of an extensive high-productivity regime that persisted over ~20myr in the southern margins of the Tethys known as the upwelling Tethys belt. This is arguably one of the most productive ecosystems in Earth history where the intensity and persistence of the upwelling system led to the deposition of OM-rich sediments.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication29th International Meeting on Organic Geochemistry, IMOG 2019
PublisherEuropean Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE
ISBN (Electronic)9789462823044
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2019
Event29th International Meeting on Organic Geochemistry, IMOG 2019 - Gothenburg, Sweden
Duration: 1 Sep 20196 Sep 2019

Publication series

Name29th International Meeting on Organic Geochemistry, IMOG 2019

Conference

Conference29th International Meeting on Organic Geochemistry, IMOG 2019
Country/TerritorySweden
CityGothenburg
Period1/09/196/09/19

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology

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