Combined close-contact and convective melting in a vertical cylindrical enclosure

T. Shockner, G. Ziskind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of phase change materials (PCM) for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) is receiving considerable amount of attention in recent years. Experimental findings have demonstrated that the so-called ‘close contact melting’ (CCM) enhances heat transfer during the melting process remarkably. Yet, the commercially-available numerical schemes are not suitable for the modeling of CCM. Therefore, in this study a new numerical model for combined convective and close-contact melting in an axisymmetric cylindrical geometry is devised. A full set of the governing conservation equations is solved using finite differencing framework, integrated with an advanced immersed boundary method for the fluid-solid interaction and enthalpy formulation for the phase change process into an original in-house code. First, the model is validated carefully for each physical phenomenon with known benchmarks. Then, a numerical study is conducted to elucidate the melting process in a vertical cylindrical enclosure heated isothermally from the bottom and side wall. Twelve study cases are considered in order to reveal the transient phase-change sequence dependence on the aspect ratio and the excess temperature. Detailed data on the flow and temperature fields are obtained. The overall results are generalized using a dimensional analysis, which includes the Fourier, Stefan and Archimedes numbers and the enclosure aspect ratio. A correlation for the melt fraction, suitable for all cases studied, is suggested.

Original languageEnglish
Article number121492
JournalInternational Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer
Volume177
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Close-contact melting
  • Dimensional analysis
  • Numerical modeling
  • Phase change material
  • Vertical tube

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