Combined time-series resistivity and geochemical tracer techniques to examine submarine groundwater discharge at Dor Beach, Israel

P. W. Swarzenski, W. C. Burnett, W. J. Greenwood, B. Herut, R. Peterson, N. Dimova, Y. Shalem, Y. Yechieli, Y. Weinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

93 Scopus citations

Abstract

A high-resolution, stationary geophysical and geochemical survey was conducted at Dor Beach, Israel, to examine the shallow coastal hydrogeology and its control on the exchange of submarine groundwater with the shallow Mediterranean Sea. Time-series resistivity profiles using a new 56 electrode (112-m long) marine cable produced detailed profiles of the fresh water/salt water interface and the subtle response of this interface to tidal excursions and other forcing factors. Such information, when ground-truthed with representative pore water salinities and formation resistivity values, can provide unique information of the extent and rates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). Time-series 222Rn measurements of the adjacent coastal water column complemented these geophysical techniques and were modeled to yield integrated advective flow rates across the sediment/water interface, which at Dor Beach ranged from about 0 to 30 cm day-1 (mean = 7.1 cm d-1), depending on the tidal range. Such results suggest that the underlying hydrogeologic framework at Dor is favorable for substantial SGD. Extrapolating these SGD estimates across a 100-m wide coastal zone implies that the Rn-derived SGD rate would equal ∼7.1 m3 d-1 per m of shoreline, and that the source of this discharging groundwater is a complex mixture of fresh groundwater derived from the upland Kurkar deposits, as well as locally recycled seawater.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberL24405
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume33
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

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