Comparative electrophysiologic effects of adenosine triphosphate and adenosine in the canine heart: Influence of atropine, propranolol, vagotomy, dipyridamole and aminophylline

Amir Pelleg, Bernard Belhassen, Reuben Ilia, Shlomo Laniado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

The electrophysiologic effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine and the modification of these effects by atropine, propranolol, vagotomy, dipyridamole and aminophylline were studied in a canine model. Both ATP and adenosine exerted transient, dose-dependent negative chronotropic and dromotropic effects on the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes, respectively. At all doses tested, the effects of ATP were more pronounced. Treatment with either atropine or propranolol plus bilateral cervical vagotomy attenuated the effects of ATP but not of adenosine. In the presence of propranolol plus vagotomy, both the negative chronotropic and dromotropic effects of ATP and adenosine were enhanced and attenuated in a similar manner by dipyridamole and aminophylline. Thus, when ATP and adenosine are injected rapidly into the right atrium of the intact canine heart, vagal involvement in the mechanism of action of ATP but not of adenosine is mainly responsible for the difference in the magnitude of the electrophysiologic effects of these 2 compounds, and only a small part of the electrophysiologic effects of ATP are the result of its degradation to adenosine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-576
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Feb 1985
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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