Conservation meets restoration–rescuing threatened plant species by restoring their environments and restoring environments using threatened plant species

Sergei Volis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Plant conservation biology needs a new approach to cope with the rapid disappearance of species and ecosystems. This paper is an attempt to introduce such an approach via conceptual integration of conservation biology and restoration ecology in what can be called conservation-oriented restoration. Use of this term is limited to cases when restoration is applied to a still-functioning ecosystem, excluding cases when the destroyed ecosystem must be recreated or altered to a desirable state. The paper demonstrates the importance of habitat restoration for the majority of threatened species, and, although it may seem paradoxical, advocates usefulness of threatened plant species for restoration of natural habitats. It is proposed that threatened plant species should become an important part of many restoration projects and be introduced not only into locations where they currently grow or grew in the recent past, but also into suitable locations within their potential distribution range. Because the number of potentially suitable locations can be close to zero if we consider only untouched natural habitats as suitable, the introduction sites should include those that require restoration efforts. The available literature is reviewed to show why and how ecological restoration should become an integral part of the conservation biologist's armory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)262-275
Number of pages14
JournalIsrael Journal of Plant Sciences
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • conservation strategy
  • ecosystem restoration
  • endangered plants
  • plant conservation
  • relocation
  • species recovery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Conservation meets restoration–rescuing threatened plant species by restoring their environments and restoring environments using threatened plant species'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this