Coordinating scheduling and rejection decisions in a two-machine flow shop scheduling problem

Dvir Shabtay, Enrique Gerstl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We study a two-machine flow shop scheduling problem where any operation can be rejected at a certain cost. A solution for such a problem requires two sets of decisions. The first involves the partition of the set of operations into two subsets: the set of operations that are accepted for scheduling in the shop, and the set of rejected operations. The second decision involves scheduling the set of accepted operations in the shop. The objective is to find a solution that minimizes the sum of the makespan and the total rejection cost. We prove that the problem is NP-hard even if all processing operations have identical processing times and identical rejection costs on either one of the two machines. We show, however, that the problem is fixed parameterized tractable with respect to a parameter that combine the number of different processing times on both machines with the number of different rejection costs on one out of the two machines. We also provide a pseudo-polynomial time algorithm for the problem, which we then convert into a fully polynomial time approximation scheme. This is achieved by dividing the problem into a set of subproblems and deriving a fully polynomial time approximation scheme for each one of them, separately. Finally, we present an integer linear programming formulation of the problem and two simple 2-approximation algorithms.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Operational Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Approximation algorithms
  • Flow shop
  • Integer linear programming
  • Rejection
  • Scheduling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Computer Science
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Information Systems and Management

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