Cross-Sectional Study on Ethnic Differences in Occupational Injuries in Southern Israel-An Eight-Year Data analysis

Yulia Treister-Goltzman, Tamar Freud, Yan Press, Roni Peleg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To characterize and compare occupational injuries among population sectors in southern Israel and to evaluate their use of healthcare services and analgesic drugs. METHODS: Retrospective cross-sectional study. RESULTS: There were 100,000 occupational injuries among 70,037 insured individuals over the study period from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2016. There was a large increase in occupational traffic injuries over this period. Compared to the veteran Jewish population, Bedouin Arabs, new immigrants and foreign workers had significantly lower rates of use of ambulatory services and imaging tests ( P < 0.001). Arabs had significantly higher odds for recurrent occupational injuries (OR = 1.29, P < 0.001), and being a new immigrant protected against recurrent injuries (OR = 0.70, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Medical staffs should invest greater effort into explaining the spectrum of diagnostic and treatment options for vulnerable groups as well as workers' rights.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-532
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume64
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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