Crusade Propaganda in Word and Image in Early Modern Italy: Niccolò Guidalottos' Panorama of Constantinople (1662)

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Abstract

The focus of this article is a vast seventeenth-century panorama of Constantinople, which is an exceptional drawing of the city, currently displayed at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. The panorama is an elaborate piece of anti-Ottoman propaganda designed by the Franciscan friar Niccoló Guidalotto da Mondavio. Guidalotto also prepared a large manuscript, held in the Vatican Library, which details the panorama's meaning and the motivation behind its creation. It depicts the city as seen from across the Golden Horn in Galata, throwing new light on both the city and the relationships between the rival Venetian Republic and the Ottoman Empire. It also trumpets the unalloyed Christian zeal of Niccoló Guidalotto and serves as a fascinating example of visual Crusade propaganda against the Ottomans in the early modern period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-543
Number of pages41
JournalRenaissance Quarterly
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Literature and Literary Theory

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