Cultural competence in multi-family psychoeducation groups: The experiences of Russian-speaking immigrant mothers of adults with severe mental illness

Evgeny Knaifel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The successful integration of cultural competence with evidence-based practices in mental health services is still limited for particular cultural populations. The current study explored culturally adapted family psychoeducation intervention for immigrants from the former Soviet Union (FSU) in Israel who care for a family member with severe mental illness (SMI). Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 immigrant mothers about their experience of taking part in Russian-speaking multi-family psychoeducation groups (MFPGs). Qualitative content analysis revealed five salient processes and changes that participants attributed to their engagement in the intervention: 1) from a language barrier to utilization of and satisfaction with services; 2) from a lack of information to acquiring new mental health knowledge; 3) from harboring a family secret to exposure and sharing; 4) from social isolation to cultural belonging and support; 5) from families blurring boundaries to physical and emotional separation. The results showed that these changes—linguistic, cognitive, emotional, socio-cultural and relational—improved family coping and recovery. Implications for cultural adaptation of family psychoeducation for Russian-speaking immigrants are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-166
Number of pages11
JournalTranscultural Psychiatry
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2023

Keywords

  • cultural competence
  • culturally adapted intervention
  • family psychoeducation
  • former Soviet Union immigrants
  • Russian-speaking groups
  • severe mental illness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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