Days of (un) Rest: Political Consumerism and the Struggle over the Sabbath: Political consumerism and the struggle over the Sabbath

Guy Ben Porat, Omri Shamir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

In spite of legal limitations, commerce in Israel on the Sabbath has expanded significantly in the past two decades. This secular development is counteracted by religious boycotts of stores operating on the Sabbath. Using Ulrich Beck’s concept of sub-politics, we explain the shift away from the formal political realm, a result of a deadlocked political system that is no longer able to regulate boundaries between the religious and secular realm. As a result, both religious and secular communities use their power as consumers, albeit in different ways, to shape the public sphere. Using media reports and open-ended interviews with religious and secular entrepreneurs we demonstrate how, first, the value of formal political channels was eroded and, second, how the economic power of religious and secular consumers is used
in the new struggles to shape the day of rest.
Original languageEnglish GB
Pages (from-to)161-186
Number of pages26
JournalPolitics and Religion
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Sociology and Political Science

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