Dependency and self-criticism among first-time mothers: The roles of global and specific support

Beatriz Priel, Avi Besser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

The assumption that the frequency of depressive symptoms among highly dependent and highly self-critical first-time mothers is mediated by a distinct attitude toward social support is explored. It is hypothesized that self-criticism reduces the perceived availability of social support, which in turn increases the risk of depressive symptoms. Dependency scores were expected to effect an increase of the perceived availability of social support, thus reducing depressive symptomatology after delivery. Personality variables were assumed to affect global support mainly. Results reiterate previous findings about the protective effects of dependency in the transition to motherhood, and support a mediation model of global and specific support for the dependency and self-criticism associations with depressive symptoms. Even though self-criticism and dependency showed different patterns of association with specific and global support, husband's support was found to play a protective role in relation to these two personality variables.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-450
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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