Diagnostic medical auxiliary equipment in a field hospital: Experience from the Israeli delegation to the site of the Turkish earthquake at Adapazari

A. S. Finestone, Y. Bar-Dayan, Y. Wolf, M. Stein, J. Tearosh, Y. Zaide, D. Mankuta, A. Eldad, P. Benedek

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

An earthquake striking a highly populated area is likely to cause a mass casualty situation for even the most advanced trauma center. If the local medical teams are injured and the hospitals are damaged beyond immediate repair, external intervention is needed. In the Turkish earthquake crisis, Israel was one of many states to deploy a field hospital to the crisis site. This was set up in Adapazari, the second most severely hit city in terms of the amount of damage. The hospital provided advanced surgical and medical facilities, including laparotomy, cesarean section, and intensive care surveillance. These facilities require sophisticated laboratory and radiology services, including hematology, chemistry, microbiology, and blood bank. The speed with which the hospital must be assembled and transported to be efficient and the basic conditions of a field hospital dictate specific considerations regarding diagnostic auxiliary equipment. Considerations in choosing this equipment, problems encountered during installation, and recommendations for the future are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)637-640
Number of pages4
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume166
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

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