Dickens and the Virtual City: Urban Perception and the Production of Social Space: [Review]

Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Arts/Article review

Abstract

Dickens’s city, like the vaunted London of the first half of the nineteenth century, is immeasurable and incommensurate. It is a topic that has appealed to scholars and anyone fascinated by Britain’s world city, but also by the representation of urban experience as a phenomenon of modernity, as well as postmodernity. Murail and Thornton’s collection of original essays by established scholars and young researchers explores the familiar “social” novels (foremost among them Dombey and Son, Bleak House and Our Mutual Friend) through the lens of recent social and critical theory, particularly Lefébvre, Certeau and Deleuze, with (surprisingly) only a couple of mentions of Foucault and Benjamin.
Original languageEnglish GB
Pages (from-to)70-72
Number of pages3
JournalDickens Quarterly
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

Keywords

  • Murail
  • Estelle -- editor
  • 1812-1870
  • Criticism and interpretation
  • Dickens
  • Charles
  • Rushdie
  • Salman
  • 21st century
  • Eliot
  • T S (Thomas Stearns) (1888-1965)
  • Jews
  • Intertextuality
  • Modernity
  • Cultural factors
  • Ternan
  • Ellen
  • Collins
  • Wilkie (1824-1889)
  • Novels
  • Cultural identity
  • Cultural change
  • Cities
  • Books
  • Essays

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